HIV Law Project Joins Mobilization to End AIDS | June 2011

HIV Law Project joined other international and local activists in a protest march to demand that world leaders keep their promise to achieving universal access to treatment. The coordinated mobilization on June 8th coincided with the 30th Anniversary of the first AIDS case and targeted the United Nation’s third High Level Meeting on HIV/AIDS.

HIV treatment has long been a human rights issue, based on the principles that health and access to healthcare are fundamental human rights. We have long know that effective HIV treatment improves the health and overall longevity of individuals infected with HIV. We now know that effective treatment can reduce the risk of HIV transmission by 96%. Yet, in the United States alone, over 8,000 people are on waiting lists to access HIV medication. Globally, that number rises to over 9 million people who need treatment but are not getting it.

With a commitment to funding treatment, we can end candle light vigils for awareness. With a commitment to putting at least 15 million people on AIDS treatment by 2015, we can end AIDS. K. Lynn Moses, Esq. | HIV Law Project
“With a commitment to putting at least 15 million people on AIDS treatment by 2015, we can end AIDS.”
K. Lynn Moses, Esq.

“I grew up in this city along with the pandemic. I observed the specter of HIV/AIDS ravage the city, the nation, and the world. I made a commitment to work to see its end,” said K. Lynn Moses, Esq., an attorney at HIV Law Project as she addressed the marchers gathered in Bryant Park. “With a commitment to funding treatment, we can end candle light vigils for awareness. With a commitment to funding treatment, we can end adding names to the quilt. With a commitment to putting at least 15 million people on AIDS treatment by 2015, we can end AIDS.”

“Access to effective HIV treatment must become nonnegotiable both in the United States and abroad,” said Shahmet Gordon, HIV Law Project’s spokesperson at the event

Universal access to treatment must become a central strategy in the fight against AIDS and world leaders must recommit to specific targets to move the global community to such access by 2015. In addition, advocates called for:

  • Full funding to end AIDS;
  • Respect for human rights of all people, including women;
  • 15 million people on AIDS treatment by 2015;
  • The end to trade agreements that put profits and patents ahead of human life;
  • Adoption of an international declaration on poverty, housing instability and AIDS;
  • Reduction in tuberculosis deaths among people living with HIV/AIDS by at least 50%;
  • Reduction of new HIV infections via sex by 50%; and
  • Elimination of new HIV infections from injection drug use and perinatal transmission.

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